Scam About Lost Pets

PawBoost Blog

Posted By : Clayton G.                                  www.pawboost.com/blog/2017-4-21-how-to-recognize-and-avoid-the-lost-pet-scam/

Recognizing and Avoiding the Lost Pet Scam

If you are searching for your lost pet, the best thing you can do is spread the word to as many people as possible. Unfortunately, this may sometimes attract unscrupulous scammers looking to profit off your desperate situation.

Please read the following information to protect yourself from becoming a victim.

Found a pet? Scroll down for tips on avoiding the found pet scam.

Recognizing the Lost Pet Scam

1. They demand you wire them money first. They may request payment by Western Union, Money Gram, cashier’s check, money order, escrow service, Bitcoin, etc. You can safely assume that anyone who asks you to pay them in this manner (in this context) is a scammer.

2. They won’t meet in person. They pretend to be unable or refuse to meet you face-to-face before initiating the transaction.

3. They will meet, but find an excuse why you should pay them before actually seeing the animal. They may offer to meet you at a public location to return your pet and collect the reward you have offered. When you get there, they may tell you your pet is in their car and will go get him for you as soon as you pay the reward. Once they have the money, they will disappear.

Please scroll down to the bottom of the page to see an up-to-date list of scams.

Example of a Scam:

Reported on January 5, 2017: Beware of vague, generic messages from people claiming to have found your pet. The above message came from a real scammer.

 

Tips to Avoid Being Scammed

1. Never wire money to anyone you don’t know or haven’t met.

 Beware if someone asks you to wire them money before retrieving your pet. Photo credit: WikiVisual

Beware if someone asks you to wire them money before retrieving your pet. Photo Credit: WikiVisual

2. Don’t ask leading questions. If someone claims to have found your pet, don’t ask leading questions like ‘Does he have white socks on his front paws?’ Instead, make them provide the description. Ask the person to describe something about your pet that wouldn’t be visible in pictures that may have been posted. If the person fails to come up with an identifying physical attribute, it is likely they are attempting to scam you.

 If the person really has your pet, they should be able to describe identifying physical attributes without your help.   Photo credit: Pexels
If the person really has your pet, they should be able to describe identifying physical attributes without your help.   Photo Credit: Pexels

3. Meet in a public place. If you are absolutely confident this person has your pet, arrange to make the exchange in person and in a public place. Do not attempt to send them money before meeting and reclaiming your loved one.

Losing a pet is a traumatic experience. Don’t make things even more difficult by falling victim to a lost pet scam. Always be safe, be alert, and don’t give up hope!

Found a pet? Beware of this cruel scam

While people with lost pets may be more likely to become the victim of a scam, people who have found a pet can also be a target. A scammer may contact you pretending to be the owner of the pet you found. In reality, they are trying to dupe you into giving them the pet so they can sell it for a profit.

 Some pets, especially purebreds, are sought out by scammers to be illegally sold for a profit. It is up to you to verify proof of ownership before giving up your found pet. Photo credit: Pexels
Some pets, especially purebreds, are sought out by scammers to be illegally sold for a profit. It is up to you to verify proof of ownership before giving up your found pet. Photo Credit: Pexels

If someone contacts you claiming to be the pet’s owner, you must verify their claim before handing the pet back to them. Vet records, ownership or breeding papers, and even family photos are all viable ways to prove ownership. If the person is unable to produce any of these, it is likely they are attempting to pull off a scam.

If you are contacted by the owner of the pet you found and are able to verify proof of ownership, that is amazing news! It is always best to play it safe by arranging to meet in a public place to give them back their furry family member.

 Reuniting a pet with her family is one of the best feelings in the world. Photo credit: Pexels
Reuniting a pet with her family is one of the best feelings in the world. Photo Credit: Pexels

Ongoing Scams

1. Reported on December 20, 2018:

Beware of weird emails talking about investments. There are about 50 variations of this message that are being sent from info@finance.com.

2. Reported on December 18, 2018:

Beware of messages asking for you to contact them in order to send you an outrageous amount of money. The sender is using the email alexdiegu@yahoo.co.uk.

2. Reported on December 11, 2018:

Beware of messages notifying you that a distant relative has passed and you are the benefactor of an outrageous amount of money. They just want to steal your personal information.

3. Reported on December 5, 2018:

Beware of messages asking for your personal information in order to send you an outrageous amount of money.

4. Reported on November 29, 2018:

Beware of messages offering generous amounts of money with a fishy sob story. The sender is using the email tinachima61@gmail.com with different variations of numbers after ‘tinachima.’

5. Reported on November 20, 2018:

Beware of messages regarding compensation for a previous business transaction. Do not be fooled by the outrageous amount of money via an ATM card, this is meant to entice you to get your personal information. The sender is using similar email addresses: lisamuna77@yahoo.com; lisamuna10@yahoo.com; lisamuna444@yahoo.com; lisamuna213@yahoo.com.

6. Reported on May 23, 2018:

Beware of the Bitcoin scam. The scammer will demand money via Bitcoin to return your pet.

7. Reported on August 10, 2017:

Beware of messages requesting your help to transfer outrageous amounts of money. Variations of this email are being sent around wanting to get your personal information.

8. Reported on January 5, 2017:

Beware of vague, generic messages from people claiming to have found your pet. The above message came from a real scammer.

 

 

COMMENTS FROM LOVINMYPUP:

We live in a time where scams are not few and far between.   There are all kinds of scams that we deal with during the course of our daily activities.    But this one is a new one on me.     We all love our pets, many of us treat our pets like our children!   Of course we will move heaven and earth to find our lost fur baby.    Please make sure you read this story and look at the comments below the article.  Also share this info with friends and family.   Be Prepared Use these tricks to identify scams for lost pets       Preparation is the way to go.

Don’t forget to check out the banner/links to the various on line stores to the right of this page  (lap top) or beneath the article (smart phone).  There are traditional pet stores as well as well as  specialty stores for gifts that would make any pet parent ecstatic!  There is also a link to Amazon and Walmart where you can purchase anything that they sell.   We are delighted to announce a new affiliate agreement with  Embark Vet (DNA testing for pups)  Just click on the links and shop for pet products as well as fabulous gifts for the pet fanatics on your holiday lists!   Please note that Lovinmypup will receive a small percentage  from each purchase.through the links on this site.    This percentage helps us keep the site up and running.  We thank you in advance for your assistance in keeping this site operational.

Purchases through these links  help me keep this site up and running.

Make sure you share your love with your pet each and every day!

 

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